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The Lied, Art Song, and Choral Texts Archive

Index of the authors of the texts used in art songs and other classical vocal music

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Explanatory Notes

  • Each letter-link will bring you to a list of names. Each author/poet/librettist name is followed by a number in parentheses indicating the number of his/her unique texts that are available on this website. The name-link will take you to a mixed list of titles and first lines. Note that most of the titles are those chosen by the composer.
  • Alphabetization follows North American convention. Spaces are significant and letters with diacritics are alphabetized as their underlying letter alone would be (except for ß which is alphabetized as "ss").
  • Possible formats for first lines and titles:
    • First line: Composer (Title)
    • First line: Composer
        for songs with no names (e.g., in some song cycles)
    • Title: Composer
    • Recurring Title: Composer (First line)
        Some examples of recurring titles: "Lied", "Sehnsucht", "Song", "Chanson".
  • If the first line is too short to be helpful, the next line (or part of it) will be appended as well for added ease of identification.
  • Common abbreviations for texts in translation: Cz. = Czech, Finn. = Finnish, F or Fr. = French, G = German, It. = Italian, L = Latin, P = Polish, R or Russ. = Russian, Sw. = Swedish, E = English. For example, if a text originally in German was set in a Russian translation, the Russian title and first line will appear in the German poet's index with (R) next to them. If the translator is known, the title and first line will appear in that author's page with (tr) next to them. When possible, the original-language text will be provided.
  • Russian names are not transliterated in the same style as the texts. The transliteration is looser and follows the North American convention of using `y' rather than `j'.
  • Note on transliterations of texts [from the Introduction].